You are selecting springs for a large antique clock; to determine the forces they will exert in the clock, you need to know their spring

Academic Writing advanced-physics You are selecting springs for a large antique clock; to determine the forces they will exert in the clock, you need to know their spring

advanced-physics

You are selecting springs for a large antique clock; to determine the forces they will exert in the clock, you need to know their spring

You are selecting springs for a large antique clock; to determine the forces they will exert in the clock, you need to know their spring constants. A book recommends a static approach, in which objects of different weights either stretch (or compress) the spring and the displacement from equilibrium is measured. You wish to determine if this static approach yields the same kind of relationship for the spring constant for the extension spring in your kit. From your kit you will have a two dowels, a spring, ruler, washers to use for mass, paper clips to hang the mass and a scale. Make two pictures for the spring.  Make one before you suspend an object, and one after an object is suspended and the spring is at rest. Draw a coordinate system.  On each picture, label the position where the spring is unstretched or uncompressed, the distance from the unstretched or uncompressed position to the stretched or compressed position, the mass of the object, and the spring constant. Draw a force diagram for an object hanging from a spring at rest .  Label the forces acting on the object. Use Newton’s second law to write the equation of equilibrium for the object. Solve the equation for the spring constant in terms of the other values in the equation. What does this tell you about the slope of a displacement (from the unstretched position) versus weight of the object graph?

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